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Has anyone ever noticed that Apple's album artwork server will happily return you the full-resolution original file if you think to ask for it…? is1-ssl.mzstatic.com/image/thu

The biggest file in the srcset on the itunes store page was 939 pixels, and I'd almost settled for that when I noticed that the original filename was part of the URL, and it said 3000x3000...

and sure enough, despite how pixely that file looks, if you ask for anything above 3000x0w, it'll still just return you a 3000x3000 file...!

which brings me to my real question -- is anyone preserving these??

I kinda want to scrape these onto the Internet Archive before Apple catches on (or just unknowingly fails to preserve this functionality in a later version of the store...)

I'm not sure if folks are already doing that though; if there's a larger effort I could be coordinating with?

(I know the Internet Archive has a cover art collection in cooperation with MusicBrainz, but I don't know if anybody contributing to that is aware of the option to ask the iTunes server to return higher-res copies than it's letting on that it has...)

@ravenworks Change the file extension to .tif or .png and inspect the file you download - you might get a nice surprise! That led me to inspect the website headers, and it seems from this (curl -v): gist.github.com/ross-spencer/1 the site is driven by Akamai Image Manager akamai.com/us/en/products/web- so that might give you more info about the ultimate quality of image being returned or how to get more from it.

@beet_keeper Sorry to reply to this so late—I forgot to come back until now, heh :)

oh my god, though—great catch with the PNG thing, I never would have thought of that!! Comparing them in photoshop, it's clearly less compressed than the jpeg version; what a miracle..!

I'm afraid I don't have the context to make sense of the stuff at the github link, though..!

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